Results 110 of 13 for "Bias-free language"X
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  • 1.Guidelines for Nonhandicapping Language in APA Journals
    Certain words or phrases can express gender, ethnic, or racial bias either intentionally or unintentionally. This page provides guidelines on avoiding bias in language.
    Guidelines (April 1992)
  • 2.Historical Context
    Authors are encouraged to avoid perpetuating demeaning attitudes and biased assumptions about people in their writing. At the same time, historians and scholars writing analyses of past events or times or of historical figures must be careful not to misrepresent the ideas of the past in an effort to avoid language bias.
    Web Page
  • 3.Bias-Free Language
    Writers using APA Style must strive to use language that is free of bias and avoid perpetuating prejudicial beliefs or demeaning attitudes in their writing. Topics covered: age, disability, gender, participation in research, race and ethnicity, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, and intersectionality.
    Web Page
  • 4.The Basics of Sixth Edition APA Style
    This free tutorial is designed for those who have no previous knowledge of sixth edition APA Style.
    Web Page
  • 5.General Principles for Reducing Bias
    When you refer to a person or persons, choose words that are accurate, clear, and free from bias or prejudicial connotations. Bias, like inaccurate or unclear language, can be a form of imprecision. For example, using “man” to refer to all human beings is not as accurate or inclusive as using the terms 'individuals,' 'people,' or 'persons.'
    Web Page
  • 6.Sexual Orientation
    Sexual orientation is a part of individual identity that includes 'a person’s sexual and emotional attraction to another person and the behavior and/or social affiliation that may result from this attraction.'
    Web Page
  • 7.Racial and Ethnic Identity
    Race refers to physical differences that groups and cultures consider socially significant (e.g., Aboriginal, African American or Black, Asian, European American or White). Ethnicity refers to shared cultural characteristics such as language, ancestry, practices, and beliefs.
    Web Page
  • 8.Intersectionality
    Be sensitive to intersectionality — the way in which individuals are shaped by and identify with a vast array of cultural, structural, sociobiological, economic, and social contexts. Dimensions of identity and social systems include racism, genderism, heterosexism, ageism, and classism,
    Web Page
  • 9.Socioeconomic Status
    Socioeconomic status encompasses not only income but also educational attainment, occupational prestige, and subjective perceptions of social status and social class.
    Web Page
  • 10.Participation in Research
    People participate in research in a variety of settings, including laboratories, homes, schools, businesses, clinics, and hospitals. Descriptive terms such as 'college students,' 'children,' or 'respondents' as well as the more general terms such as 'participants' and 'subjects' are acceptable.
    Web Page
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Results 110 of 13 for "Bias-free language"X