This page contains reference examples for TED Talks, including the following:

  1. TED Talk from the TED website 
  2. TED Talk from YouTube 

1. TED Talk from the TED website

Cuddy, A. (2012, June). Your body language may shape who you are [Video]. TED Conferences. https://www.ted.com/talks/amy_cuddy_your_body_language_shapes_who_you_are

  • Parenthetical citation: (Cuddy, 2012) 
  • Narrative citation: Cuddy (2012)
  • When the TED Talk comes from TED’s website, use the name of the speaker as the author. 
  • Provide as specific a date as possible; in the example, only the year and month are available. 
  • Include the description “[Video]” in square brackets after the title of the talk. 
  • Credit TED Conferences as the publisher of the TED Talk and then provide the URL.

2. TED Talk from YouTube

TED. (2019, November 13). The danger of AI is weirder than you think | Janelle Shane [Video]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OhCzX0iLnOc

  • Parenthetical citation: (TED, 2019) 
  • Narrative citation: TED (2019)
  • When the TED Talk is on YouTube, list the owner of the YouTube account (here, TED) as the author to aid in retrieval. 
  • Provide as specific a date as possible. 
  • Include the description “[Video]” in square brackets after the title of the talk. 
  • Credit YouTube as the publisher of the TED Talk and then provide the URL. 
  • When the speaker is not listed as the author, integrate their name into the narrative if desired: 
    • Shane explained that the artificial intelligence technically “did what they asked it to do—they just accidentally asked it to do the wrong thing” (TED, 2019, 8:51).

TED Talk references are covered in Section 10.12 of the APA Publication Manual, Seventh Edition